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Austin360Cooks: Three-ingredient cereal milk ice cream

Addie Broyles
abroyles@statesman.com

Austin360Cooks, our new social media project to show off what you’re cooking at home, is still going strong in its third week, and today, in conjuction with a story and video from Melissa Martinez about making a rich, custard-base ice cream, we highlight a super easy ice cream from an Austin food blogger who was drinking cereal milk long before it became A Thing.

The current cereal milk trend can be traced back to Christina Tosi, the pastry chef at Momofuku Milk Bar in New York City, but Tosi’s technique calls for quite a few steps to achieve a simple treat that so many of us enjoy after finishing a bowl of our favorite sugary cereal.

Austinite Kristina Wolter, who writes the blog Girl Gone Grits, knew there had to be an easier way, so she created a three-ingredient, three-step recipe for cereal milk ice cream using her childhood favorite, Frosted Flakes. She posted a photo of the ice cream on Instagram (@girlgonegrits) using the #Austin360Cooks hashtag, which prompted others to chime in with suggestions for using cereal milk in other ways, such as a sweetener in coffee, a White Russian or a shake.

You can share your latest triumphs in the kitchen by adding #Austin360Cooks to your tweets, FB posts or Instagrams. To see what others are sharing, go to bit.ly/austin360cooks.

— Addie Broyles

Cereal Milk Ice Cream

1 1/2 cups whole milk

3 cups heavy cream

3 cups cereal, such as Frosted Flakes

In a bowl, combine all the ingredients. Soak for 15 to 20 minutes. Using a colander, strain the liquid to remove the soaked cereal. (You can use the back of a wooden spoon to squeeze out as much liquid as you can.) Discard (or eat) the soggy cereal.

Because some cereals have more sugar than others, taste the milk and cream mixture and add a little more sugar or vanilla, if needed. Pour the mixture into your ice cream maker and process, following the manufacturer’s directions. When serving, top with additional cereal, if desired.

— Kristina Wolter, Girl Gone Grits (girlgonegrits.com)