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Offensive Deep Eddy Vodka continues to air, despite complaints

Addie Broyles
abroyles@statesman.com

I really didn’t want to have to write this post.

The Austin-based Deep Eddy Vodka caused a stir last week with an offensive new ad in which a guy, “Creep Eddy,” who “crashes parties” and makes unwanted advances on women, including spitting “vodka” on them.

Last week, Austin Gastronomist blogger Kathryn Hutchison wrote the definitive takedown explaining why Deep Eddy shouldn’t base an ad campaign on a guy touching women when they’ve asked him not to.

Here’s the gist:

“His admission that ‘we crashed parties…’ implies that the women in the advertisements weren’t actresses who accepted a role. These were real women at parties in Austin, getting spit on and hit on so that Deep Eddy can make more money.”

On Twitter, they claimed to have removed the video and, essentially, that they were sorry “you people who care about how women are portrayed and treated in media” (my quotes, not theirs) were offended.

The non-apology is irritating, but I was hoping that the video would disappear and I wouldn’t have to take them to task here on my work blog.

But that all changed over the past few days when I heard Creep Eddy’s voice coming from my kids’ bedroom.

Like just about every kid in America these days, my children watch YouTube in the way that we used to watch regular television, and like any media platform, that comes with advertising. They know all about how deceptive marketing can be and have become quite scrupulous about the ads that appear in front of their favorite YouTube shows, including the Fine Brothers’ awesome Kids React series.

It was during a pre-roll for that decidedly kid-friendly show that the Deep Eddy video has been popping up over and over again during the past few days.

I tweeted my displeasure yesterday, but now that I see Deep Eddy still hasn’t owned up to the fact that they are using this ad in an active campaign (and nor have they engaged with the most recent string of tweets), I decided it was time to take the conversation off social media and post something on the record here.

While we’re waiting on the company to respond, let’s take a poll: