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After 11 years, downtown music venue Momo's closing doors

Peter Mongillo
Paul Oveisi, owner of Momo's, moved to New York in November. According to the club's Facebook page, renovations to the club's building led to its closure after 11 years.

Just a few days before the final night at Emo's on Red River Street, Austin lost another of popular music venue when Momo's shut down Tuesday.

Owner Paul Oveisi, who relocated to New York in November, announced the closure on the club's Facebook page, saying the venue was forced to close due to renovations.

"It is with a heavy heart that I announce after 11 years Momo's on 6th is closing," Oveisi wrote. "While I cannot go into all the details, legally I can say the following: 'The building that is currently home to Momo's is under construction and undergoing a large renovation. Under present circumstances, Momo's will no longer be operating at this location. The building owner is working with Momo's to secure a new home and hope to find one as soon as possible.'\u2009"

Momo's was on the upper level of 618 W. Sixth St., the same building as Katz's Deli, which closed in January. The building was purchased by World Class Capital Group, which also acquired the downtown buildings that housed the Spaghetti Warehouse and La Zona Rosa, another downtown music club.

Nate Paul, president and CEO of World Class Capital Group, was not immediately available for comment.

For 11 years, Momo's has been a hub of Americana and rock music in downtown Austin.

The club, which offered live, mostly local music seven days a week, served as a home base for several area performers, including Suzanna Choffel, Band of Heathens and more recently Sons of Fathers. At the time of the announcement, music was booked most nights through March, including a New Year's Eve show with Austin funk group Foot Patrol.

The closing comes at a time when the future of live music in downtown Austin in uncertain. Across town on Red River Street, rising property values tied to the Waller Creek Tunnel Project threaten to make the district too expensive for music clubs to remain open.

pmongillo@statesman.com