Austin filmmaker Elizabeth Carroll followed noted cookbook author Diana Kennedy for more than 6 years before releasing her feature-length documentary, "Nothing Fancy," at South by Southwest last year.


The film is the first to offer such an up-close portrait of the famously prickly 97-year-old writer, horticulturalist, culinary teacher and food anthropologist, and last week, it finally hit all the mainstream streaming services.


Now called "Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy," the 81-minute film is now streaming on Amazon Prime Video, YouTube, Google Play and iTunes, as well as through independent theaters, such as the Violet Crown.


From the review I wrote of the film last year:


"Featuring home videos, personal photos, interviews with more than half a dozen chefs, music from Austin composer Graham Reynolds and unprecedented access to Kennedy and her Michoacán homestead, the documentary captures the feistiness and passion of the ’adorable narcissist’ who continues to teach cooking classes and travel to talk about her work....


Although in remarkable health and still driving, Kennedy talks about her anxieties about growing old. ’I wish I could make a pact with the devil and retrace all my steps in this country. There’s too much to do,’ she says, looking around her office that holds more than 60 years of papers and notes."


Kennedy has been a frequent visitor to Austin over the years, befriending Tom Gilliland, owner of Fonda San Miguel, who hosted a community celebration for her last year.


The film, from Greenwich Entertainment, was nominated for a James Beard Award earlier this year, but it lost out to "That's My Jazz," a documentary about pastry chef Milt Abel II, which you can find on Vimeo. You can find out more about the movie at dianakennedymovie.com.