Stroopwafels have become so popular in the past five years that when United Airlines tried to remove these Dutch sweet treats from their flights in 2018, customers bit back.


United eventually relented and brought the stroopwafels back, and even though they don’t give out Chantal Piët’s stroopwafels, it’s been a boon to her Austin-based business, Stroop Club.


Piët and husband Tako Vermeulen moved to Central Texas from the Netherlands in 2015 and started Stroop Club, which was one of the early stroopwafel companies in the U.S. This was before many U.S. consumers knew what they were, but thanks to their presence on United flights and McDonald’s limited edition run of stroopwafel McFlurry, most Americans than ever are seeking out this caramel-filled sandwich.


For years, the couple sold both freshly made and packaged stroopwafels at local farmers markets, but they’ve recently transitioned to selling strictly the packaged versions online and in retail stores and coffee shops.


You can currently find the stroopwafels at coffee shops around Austin, including Caffe Medici, Monkey Nest and Revival Coffee, as well as some outside the state, and you can also find them at markets including Arlan's, FreshPlus and Royal Blue Grocery.


A few places, such as Creature Coffee, Spokesman and Barrett's, are also carrying Piët’s newest product: stroopwafel syrup, a product she makes in partnership with an Austin-based simple syrup company called Better Flavor Co.


The stroopwafel syrup, which has hints of cinnamon and caramel, can be used as a syrup for pancakes or a topping for ice cream, Piët’s says, but many customers — and those coffee shops — use the syrup to make a stroopwafel latte.


Arlan’s Market, 7108 Woodrow Ave., is the only brick-and-mortar retail store that carries the syrup right now, but you can also buy it at stroopclub.com. (Online, the stroopwafels cost $14 for 12, and the syrup is $10 for 8 ounces)


Piët has expanded the product line in the past five years to include several varieties, including a chai caramel, chocolate, gluten-free and vegan stroopwafels, and those vegan stroopwafels are now going into a vegan stroopwafel cheesecake that is now for sale by the slice at Rebel Cheese, the vegan cheese and charcuterie shop at 2200 Aldrich St.


If you were a fan of the warm stroopwafels at the farmers market, Piët says to stay tuned to their social media accounts (@stroopclub) to find out about some pop-up stroopwafel stands at FreshPlus they are planning for this spring.


Stroopwafel Cheesecake


The fun about vegan baking is that there's less science to it. You don’t have to be as exact with the order of adding ingredients or at what temperature. To make the stroopwafel crumbs, pulse two stroopwafels in a food processor until crumbs form. Add coconut oil, pulse twice, and then press into the bottom of a springform pan. To make the crust, you could also use graham crackers instead of stroopwafels, but add an extra drizzle of coconut oil and a dash of cinnamon.


— Chantal Piët


For the crust:


2 cups crushed stroopwafel crumbs


1 tablespoon coconut oil


For the filling:


2 (6-ounce) packages of vegan cream cheese (such as Nuttin’ Ordinary)


1 cup soaked cashews


1/3 cup vegan sugar


1/3 stroopwafel syrup


1 tablespoon lemon juice


1 tablespoon coconut oil


1 tablespoon dairy free yogurt or vegan cream cheese


1 teaspoon vanilla extract


1 teaspoon cornstarch


1 teaspoon cinnamon


1 teaspoon salt


For the topping:


3 chopped vegan stroopwafels


Heat oven to 350 degrees. Mix together the stroopwafel crumbs and oil and then press mixture into the bottom of a springform pan.


Place the filling ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Pour the filling over the crust.


Bake for 50 minutes and then cool the cheesecake fully before adding chopped stroopwafels on top. Store in the fridge unless you’re serving right away. Serves 16.


— From Chantal Piët, owner of Stroop Club