A man in his late 60s silently works while looking through a giant magnifying glass. The tiny room where he tinkers is filled with the sound of classical music and the winding and pulling of levers from broken cameras.


A photograph of a young woman hangs above his desk — his daughter whom he left home for.


Sorin Marcu left Romania because he wanted to have a family and he wanted to offer his children something he never had: a chance to be free and to do whatever they thought they had the ability to do, he said.


Marco owns Eurotech Camera Services on South First Street. The shop sits above a convenience store and shares space with an art studio.


"My specialty is fixing everything," said Marcu.


Marcu found the art of repairing cameras by chance.


At the time in the 1970s, the European country was under communist rule.


As an amateur volleyball player in a communist country, he needed to have a "fiction job" because athletes weren’t paid to play sports.


Marcu chose to work at the optics company, where he learned to make everything from glass to medical devices.


He never saw himself fixing cameras, he said, but life took him in an unexpected direction.


The young Romanian came to the United States in 1983 after living in an immigration camp for six months. The 30-year-old soon found work at a camera shop. He got the job by demonstrating his ability to take apart a camera and use the tools of the trade.


The technician worked for Studtman Photo for 10 years until opening his own shop in 1994.


His philosophy is like the Mark Twain quote, "The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why."


"It’s very limited people who do what I’m doing, and that is a pleasure to find what you’re made for," said Marcu.