When you’re putting together the furniture and decor of your house, are you thinking about creating a home that promotes health?


This year, Austin Design Week, which runs Nov. 4-8, will feature a talk on just that called Art of Wellness: Game Changers.


Moderator Alexis Simón, of Alexis Simón Design, has put together a showcase at the Four Seasons Residences to illustrate how wellness and design go together throughout a home. Simón is designing the living room, which she says is all about creating a comfortable space for community to gather. “It’s bringing together your sunshine committee of family and friends,” she says.


She’ll use a neutral palette of furnishings, floors and paint colors, “making the people the center of the room,” she says.


Gloria Chan, who is a mindfulness expert for Recalibrate, will create an office that is well organized, one that is not too much or too messy. Instead, it will have one focal point and a system to keep everything neat to allow the user to not be overwhelmed or distracted by their surroundings.


Karli Kershaw, a wellness and yoga instructor and nutritionist, is transforming the kitchen. It will include fruit such as lemons or oranges that are both design elements and a healthy snack or addition to water. The kitchen will also include an area with plants where you can do yoga or meditate.


Karen Kopicki, of Kopicki Design, is in charge of the bedroom area. The bedroom is all about a space that promotes sleeping. Tips include installing blackout curtains, creating ambient noise and keeping lighting dim. It should be minimalist and without TV.


Rashanna Moss, former owner of Pure Barre, will create a gym space that shows you how to transform a small space into an area for fitness by adding some exercise bands and equipment by a window.


Robin Emmerich, who is an artist and life coach and leggings designer, will outfit a creative space by adding color and plants to inspire, whether you like to journal or paint.


During the panel, you can wander through the Skyline Room at the Four Seasons Residences to see each of the areas.


Five things Simón recommends are using neutrals, using lighting designed for the purpose of the space, adding plants or elements of nature, clearing out excess junk and embracing minimalism, and creating opportunities for movement.


Of course, there are higher levels of wellness design such as using paints and fabrics that are less toxic, but to start, Simón says the goal is to “empower people to be their own interior designer and add wellness for their space.”