1. “Dracula”

7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Sunday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday with additional 7:30 p.m. shows Oct. 1 and 8, through Nov. 3. $30-$98. 202 S. Lamar Blvd. zachtheatre.org

Zach Theatre stages Stephen Dietz’s exquisite new adaptation of Bram Stoker’s famous story. Don't let the name of this update fool you. In Dietz's "Dracula," which is now a sensual fantasy, there is a surprising twist: a bold heroine as the main character who dares to defy the ruler of the night. Mina, the object of Dracula’s desire, is in charge and, with steadfast courage, works to uncover the mystery. Expect Zach's "Dracula," playing, of course, through Halloween, to become the hottest cult classic of the season.

2. Outstanding in the Field

3 p.m. Oct. 16. $265. 3414 Lyons Rd. outstandinginthefield.com/south-events

It’s been 20 years since Outstanding in the Field started hosting pop-up dinners at farms and other outdoor venues across the country. Each year, the organization hosts a number of dinners in Texas, and this week, there are two at Boggy Creek Farm. The second multi-course dinner on Wednesday features dishes from the Brewer’s Table chef Jaime Chozet, with beer pairings provided by the East Austin restaurant as well. — Addie Broyles

3. Alamo Drafthouse of Torment

7:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Oct. 23, Oct. 31. $15. House of Torment, 2632 Ridgepoint Drive. facebook.com/events/505020420067042

The House of Torment, Austin's scariest haunted experience, continues to expand its spooky offerings and has teamed up with the Alamo Drafthouse for this one. Once a week, head to the House of Torment to watch horror flicks outside of the main attraction. Up next is the birth of Chucky in "Child's Play." Future screenings include "Night of the Living Dead." Tickets are available as a standalone purchase of $15 or as an add-on to your House of Torment admission.

4. AGLIFF Presents "Olivia"

7:30 p.m. Oct. 16. $12. Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, 1120 S. Lamar Blvd. drafthouse.com/show/olivia

The All Genders, Lifestyles, and Identities Film Festival hosts regular screenings throughout the year. Next up is a showing of Jacqueline Audry’s groundbreaking French classic. "Olivia" depicts a 19th-century boarding school that is deeply divided by the two mistresses of the house, Miss Julie and Miss Cara, who both seek the affections of their students. The 1951 film is fundamentally feminist and ahead of its time.