It's day two of weekend two at the Austin City Limits Festival, and we're not quite sure what to catch in the 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. set. So: All of it.

Or as much as we could, anyway. We cruised the park from north to south and back again, catching a few songs from four acts that were entirely different from each other. Here's how it went:

Stop 1: Rob Baird at Tito's Tent. "All the way from Austin, Texas!" boasted the announcer as this hometown up-and-comer began a set of no-frills country-rock. His four-piece backing crew included Texas Music Office honcho Brendan Anthony on acoustic guitar and fiddle, plus electric guitar, bass and drums. Word had just gone round after his set began that the Oklahoma Sooners had defeated the Texas Longhorns 34-27, which at least made the first line of Baird's second song rather timely: "I don't want to go to Oklahoma…"

As we left the tent, a fellow festgoer lifted his arms in triumph as the sun suddenly shone through the clouds at full strength for the first time all weekend. Hallelujah!

Stop 2: Dayglow at BMI Stage. And now for something completely different. Median age in the tent for Baird was probably upper-30s. At Dayglow, maybe… upper teens? The five band members can’t be much older than that; indeed, their Facebook page list lead singer/guitarist Sloan Struble as 19. The Austin group’s songs are effervescently buoyant indie-pop, and their fans sang along to most of them with glee.

And then it started raining. What’s with the weather today, anyway? Didn’t bother the kids, though; they kept on bopping and bouncing to Dayglow’s sunny groove.

Stop 3: Briston Maroney at Vrbo Stage. The Knoxville, Tennessee, indie-rocker and his three bandmates were all over the place but quite compelling. Walking up, it almost sounded like they were covering Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s heavy 1970s anthem “Ohio” — and they were, as it turned out. An intriguing choice, if unusual given they were mostly an indie rock band focused on “expressing ourselves as confused angsty young men,” Maroney admitted during a long set pause as their drummer went to fetch a tambourine. The 15 minutes I caught were a bit unorganized and uneven: “This is highly unprofessional of me, but does anyone know how much time we have left?” Maroney asked at one point. But there was no denying his onstage charisma.

And then it was raining AND the sun was out, briefly. OK then, where’s our rainbow?

Stop 4: Hippie Sabotage at Miller Lite Stage. “We drove all the way from Sacramento to party with you!” That was the end-of-set message from these two brothers, one in back on turntables and synths, the other out front exhorting the crowd. Judging from the video footage of pot plants on the screen behind them, this is a band that fans may enjoy most in a bit of an altered state. As far as we know, no hippies were sabotaged in the performance of their music.

And then it was cloudy. Or was that just a giant puff of smoke rising from the Hippie Sabotage crowd?

Dayglow at BMI Stage. And now for something completely different. Median age in the tent for Baird was probably upper-30s. At Dayglow, maybe… upper teens? The five band members can’t be much older than that; indeed, their Facebook page list lead singer/guitarist Sloan Struble as 19. The Austin group’s songs are effervescently buoyant indie-pop, and their fans sang along to most of them with glee.

And then it started raining. What’s with the weather today, anyway? Didn’t bother the kids, though; they kept on bopping and bouncing to Dayglow’s sunny groove.

Stop 3: Briston Maroney at Vrbo Stage. The Knoxville, Tennessee, indie-rocker and his three bandmates were all over the place but quite compelling. Walking up, it almost sounded like they were covering Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s heavy 1970s anthem “Ohio” — and they were, as it turned out. An intriguing choice, if unusual given they were mostly an indie rock band focused on “expressing ourselves as confused angsty young men,” Maroney admitted during a long set pause as their drummer went to fetch a tambourine. The 15 minutes I caught were a bit unorganized and uneven: “This is highly unprofessional of me, but does anyone know how much time we have left?” Maroney asked at one point. But there was no denying his onstage charisma.

And then it was raining AND the sun was out, briefly. OK then, where’s our rainbow?

Stop 4: Hippie Sabotage at Miller Lite Stage. “We drove all the way from Sacramento to party with you!” That was the end-of-set message from these two brothers, one in back on turntables and synths, the other out front exhorting the crowd. Judging from the video footage of pot plants on the screen behind them, this is a band that fans may enjoy most in a bit of an altered state. As far as we know, no hippies were sabotaged in the performance of their music.

And then it was cloudy. Or was that just a giant puff of smoke rising from the Hippie Sabotage crowd?