Chewy chocolate chip cookies are another classification of cookie. More crumbly brownie than a crisp wafer, the center of a really good chewy chocolate chip cookie is one step beyond cookie dough but not quite as melted as what you might call the ooey gooey chocolate chip cookie.

Up until a few days ago, I'd never had a chocolate chip cookie quite as deliciously chewy in the middle as these olive oil cookies from Rebecca Firth's "The Cookie Book: Decadent Bites for Every Occasion." The olive oil — a not insignificant 2/3 cup — is not the only fat in the dough, but it is the most prominently flavored and makes the middles extra dense. The butter helps keep the cookie from being too heavy, and the taste of the olive oil is subtle after they are baked. Don't skip the pinch of sea salt on top. These are a more savory sweet treat, and if you can resist overbaking them, they will hold their texture for a good number of days. For experience, if you do overbake them, they just take on a more firm bite but are still the kind of cookie that people rave about at a Chrismukkah party whose guests will ask you where you got the recipe.

One significant addition to the cookies I baked the other day was swapping out 1/2 cup of all-purpose flour with 1/2 cup chickpea flour. I was running short on regular flour, but filled in the last bit with the coarsely ground chickpea flour, which I had in my pantry to make pakoras. That textured flour added a welcomed nuance to the final cookie, but next time, I'll have plenty of flour on hand and wouldn't add more than a few tablespoons of the chickpea flour.

Olive Oil Chocolate Chip Cookies

The olive oil affects both the flavor and texture in this cookie. It first lends a fruitiness to the cookie and changes the flavor a bit from the classic but makes it delicious in surprising ways. From a texture perspective we get thin, crispy edges with a heavenly chewy center. If you haven’t made cookies with olive oil before, the time has come. Use a really delicious olive oil...one that you could drink straight from the bottle. It will lightly impart some flavor to the cookie.

— Rebecca Firth

1 1/2 cups light brown sugar, packed

2/3 cup good quality olive oil

1/2 cup granulated sugar

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature

2 large eggs, room temperature

1 1/2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 cup bread flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon sea salt

2 1/2 cups dark chocolate, coarsely chopped or chips

Sea salt flakes for the tops, optional

Heat your oven to 350 degrees and line several baking sheets with parchment paper.

In an electric stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, mix your brown sugar, olive oil, granulated sugar and butter on medium for 2 minutes, or until smooth and fully incorporated. With the mixer on low, add in the eggs, one at a time, blending the first completely before adding in the second. Then add the vanilla and continue mixing until everything is well blended. Take the bowl out of the mixer and set aside.

In a medium bowl, whisk together the all-purpose flour, bread flour, baking powder, baking soda and sea salt. Add this to the wet ingredients and fold until the cookie dough is almost blended. You still want to see streaks of flour. Add the chocolate chunks and mix until evenly distributed throughout. Gently roll into 3-tablespoon-sized balls, place on the prepared baking sheet and allow about 3 1/2 inches of space between the dough balls to allow for spread.

Sprinkle each with a pinch of sea salt flakes, if using.

Bake one sheet at a time in the center of the oven for about 12 to 14 minutes. They will look slightly underdone. Allow the cookies to cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes, and then move to a rack to finish cooling. Makes 18 to 20 large cookies.

— From "The Cookie Book: Decadent Bites for Every Occasion" by (Page Street Publishing, $21.99)