Located in Central Austin with grand streets like avenues A, B and C, the Hyde Park neighborhood was originally marketed to Austin's well-to-do in 1891 when the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Land and Town Co. platted it, and Monroe Martin Shipe marketed it. Shipe had a vested interested in it, too, because his streetcar line ran as far as Hyde Park.

On Sunday, you can walk in the footsteps of those late-19th-cenutry and early-20th-century elites by touring seven homes in the Hyde Park Neighborhood Association's 2018 Homes Tour.

This year's tour also includes houses of worship, too, including the historic Hyde Park Presbyterian Church, which has pews from almost 100 years ago, and the Palri Pema Od Ling Tibetan Buddhist Temple. The temple's lama will provide visitors instructions on how to enter the temple. This temple is notable because it has one of 20 statutes of Guru Rinpoche, the founder of Tibetan Buddhism.

One of the traditional homes, the Peake-O’Connell House, also had several owners who were pastors. For additional Asian influences, the Richmond House's owners have furnished the house in works from China, India, Indonesia and other parts of Asia.

Also on the tour is the Elisabet Ney Museum, which houses the sculptures of the famous Austin artist, and the 1950s ranch-style home that was the home of the baker Mrs. Johnson, of doughnut fame.