Oskar Blues Brewery and its nonprofit partner, the Can'd Aid Foundation, along with the Ball Corporation, is sending thousands of cans of clean drinking water to Austin on the fourth day of its boil water mandate.

The Colorado brewery that opened an Austin outpost in 2016 has supplied cans of water to areas affected by natural disaster before, through the Can'd Aid Foundation, and decided to do so here after "last week's historic deluge has overwhelmed the city's water treatment capacity," according to a news release.

A boil water notice was issued as a precaution early Monday and became mandated by state law on Tuesday after contamination in the treated water reached levels unfit for consumption. The city’s water treatment facility has struggled with the amount of silt, mud and debris in the water after flooding in the Texas Hill Country.

This week, in response to the need, Oskar Blues and Can'd Aid is shipping 11 pallets of water to its Austin brewery, with an initial run of about 26,400 cans scheduled to arrive today. Oskar Blues, a large craft brewery that originated in Colorado but has additional facilities in Texas and North Carolina, formed Can'd Aid in response to disastrous flooding in Colorado five years ago. The nonprofit has since provided cans of water to Flint, Michigan; Houston during Hurricane Harvey; and additional areas in need of relief.

Once the truckload of cans is delivered today, cases of water will be available for Austinites to pick up from Oskar Blues' North Austin taproom, at 10420 Metric Blvd., as needed.  The city has also set up seven distribution sites for free bottled water to people with special needs or those who are unable to boil water or need bottled water for work.

The Can'd Aid cans, donated by the Ball Corporation, feature artwork by an Austin artist, Mila Sketch.

Oskar Blues isn't the first Austin brewery to help out the community during the boil water notice; as early as Monday, breweries were offering their tanks full of clean, unaffected water to area residents and businesses that needed it.