Here is an interesting new release available now from cable and digital providers as well as some titles recently made available for streaming.

Video on Demand

"Ryuichi Sakamoto: Coda": I was only casually aware of the work of Sakamoto before watching this remarkable documentary and walked away from it absolutely fascinated. For fans who have been following his music career over the past four decades, you simply cannot pass up the opportunity to watch this as soon as you can. Sakamoto first found success in the Yellow Magic Orchestra, a group that hit it big during the disco era and over the years has seen success as a composer, for both solo work and film scores (including "The Last Emperor" and "The Revenant"). When the film begins, he is in the process of playing a piano that had been completely flooded in the 2011 tsunami that hit Japan. Instead of trying to retune it, he appreciates the way that the "drowned" instrument sounds now. It's an act of survival, something that Sakamoto knows a little too much about — we also see him dealing with a Stage 3 throat cancer diagnosis and determination to continue to work despite illness. Director Stephen Nomura Schible has given us an incredibly intimate and powerful look at the willpower of a creative spirit who has no interest in giving up. (Digital VOD)

Also on streaming services

"The Gospel According to André ": There's larger than life, and then there's André Leon Talley. Director Kate Novack sits down with the legend himself for many personal revelations, from growing up in the segregated South to his fashion-forward life working at "Women's Wear Daily," "W," and "Vogue" — in this sharp doc. Anna Wintour, Tom Ford and Tamron Hall are just a few of the luminaries who honor him in supplementary interviews. (Hulu)

"Never Goin' Back": Texas-based filmmaker Augustine Frizzell burst onto the festival circuit earlier this year with Sundance and South by Southwest screenings of her outrageous debut film. Angela (Maia Mitchell, "Hot Summer Nights") and Jessie (Camilla Morrone, "Death Wish") are best friends and borderline burnouts who are practically joined at the hip. They work as waitresses in a diner and are drifting through life mostly through the assistance of drugs and lots of laughter. When a planned trip to Galveston to escape for a weekend goes haywire, these two goofballs do everything they can to make it happen. We aren't often given a story of girls behaving badly that feels so authentic and focuses so fully on friendship. Mitchell and Morrone play off each other perfectly — anybody else around these two characters (including Kyle Mooney of "Saturday Night Live") is merely a guest star in their fabulously raunchy life story. (Amazon Prime)