ILYSM Ep. 29: Bumble’s Alex Williamson on improving your online dating odds

6:57 a.m. Friday, Feb. 9, 2018 Austin360 Home
Bumble's head of brand Alex Willamson (center) is a guest on the "I Love You So Much," discussing online dating with co-hosts Addie Broyles (left) and Tolly Moseley (right).

With more than 20 million users, Bumble is one of the biggest dating apps in the U.S., but what does it take to stand out in the sea of fish? In the latest episode of “I Love You So Much,” the company’s head of brand, Alex Williamson, who was part of the founding team at Bumble when it launched in 2014, joined hosts Tolly Moseley and Addie Broyles to talk about improving your chances of finding love online. It turns out that people spend the most amount of time on the app on Sundays, but people are least picky on Fridays and Saturdays.

Ellsworth Kelly was a noted artist and sculptor who died in 2015, but the Blanton Museum of Art is about to unveil what might be his greatest work. Addie interviewed the Blanton’s deputy director for curatorial affairs Carter E. Foster to find out what’s so special about this freestanding building, which opens to the public on Feb. 18, and why it will soon become a destination for art lovers around the world. (Check out Michael Barnes’ story on it as well.)

Peacocks aren’t the only animals that strut their stuff. Michael J. Ryan, a UT biology professor and “A Taste for the Beautiful,” talked with Tolly about the role that excitement plays in animal behavior and what humans can learn from mating rituals in nature. Avocados are as weird as they are delicious. For this week’s Webb Report, we brought in Eric Webb to explain what he uncovered while writing about cancer research in the Rio Grande Valley

In A Toast, Tolly recommended “Ted Radio Hour’s recent episode, “Can We Trust the Numbers?” about how developers are considering fairness, and not simply accuracy, as they create algorithms. Laura Ingalls Wilder fans will love a new book called “Caroline: Little House, Revisited” from historical fiction writer Sarah Miller. Addie explains that the book hooked her because it re-imagines “Little House on the Prairie” through the eyes of Laura’s mother. Bumble’s Alex Williamson says that what excites her most in culture today isn’t a piece of pop culture, it’s the #timesup movement that is reshaping it.

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