Here is an interesting new release available now from cable and digital providers as well as a title currently available for streaming.


Video on Demand


"Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey": First things first, you don't need to have previously watched "Suicide Squad" to jump into this sequel (I definitely didn't). Pretty much the only thing that you need to know from the first film is that our antihero Ms. Quinn is no longer in a relationship with her former boyfriend, the Joker. He doesn't play into this story at all aside from the heartache he’s caused, and the fact that every person in Gotham City that Harley wronged while under Joker’s protection is now out for her blood. Margot Robbie is an absolute joy to watch, but the fact that this is the first R-rated film in the DC Extended Universe means that you may want to hide it from the kids. The language and violence on display are raw. It's also quite fun to see actors like Rosie Perez and Ewan McGregor play roles that are quite a bit different than we usually see. There have been so few movies released this year that the bar is admittedly a little low right now, but this is the most fun I've had watching a movie in 2020. (Cable and digital VOD, 4K Ultra HD available)


» RELATED: Joker who? Harley Quinn and ‘Birds of Prey’ might be DC’s best yet


Also on streaming services


"Selah and the Spades": The directorial debut of Tayarisha Poe serves up a much different type of girl power than "Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey," but still introduces us to a young woman whom you wouldn't want to double-cross. Selah (Lovie Simone) is in her senior year at a fancy boarding school. Pushed to academic excellence by her mother, Selah maintains good grades while also being the leader of an underground network of "factions" on campus that provide students with access to all the drugs and alcohol they desire. With stylish art direction and a beautiful cast, this feels like the CW's "Riverdale" and Rian Johnson's noir-inspired high school thriller "Brick" had a baby. In fact, when the film's 97 minutes breezed by, I couldn't help but think how much better suited the characters could be by a series that expanded upon the world that we only get a taste of in the feature. I guess Amazon thought so, too, as I've since that they are adapting it into a television show. I only hope that the cast largely remains the same — Simone is captivating in the lead and carries every frame of the story. Despite its faults, there is a lot to admire with "Selah." (Amazon Prime, 4K Ultra HD available)