The folks who run America’s historic theaters were in Austin last week. They conferred their Marquee Award on  Jaston Williams, the actor, writer and director whose plays have brightened the  Paramount Theatre and  State Theater for more than three decades.

Actor, writer and director Jaston Williams receives the Marquee Award from the League of Historic American Theatres. Contributed by Don Telford

The members of the  League of Historic American Theatres do not just preserve hundreds of the country’s older venues, the keep them breathing and alive by producing and presenting all sorts of entertainment on their stages.

Among Austin’s main historic live theaters, the State and Paramount, along with the  Scottish Rite Theater (originally  Turn Verein), Scholz Hall (now known as  Scholz Garten) and  HoggAuditorium, still see performances. The  Millett Opera House stands but long ago lost its theatrical function; it now houses the  Austin Club, which is reviving the memory of the building’s theatrical past. Among those lost to time:  Hancock Opera House,  Brauss Hall, Peck’s Hall, Austin Opera House,  Long’s Opera House, Smith’s OperaHouse,  Casino Theater and  Capitol Theater.

Austin’s Paramount served as host of the League’s annual summer conference and at a dinner on July 15, Williams, who often worked with collaborator  Joe Sears on the “Greater Tuna” comedies, picked up the honor that has gone to  Hal Holbrook,  Garrison Keillor and  Vince Gill. The Marquee Award, established in 2012, goes to artists who inspire League members and also showcase the historic theaters where they perform.

Stars for Williams and Sears were planted under the Paramount’s marquee years ago. Three years ago, on its 100th birthday, the theater, built for vaudeville in 1915, regained it upright blade sign which once again graces Congress Avenue.

RELATED: A populist palace, the Paramount has hosted acts for 100 years.