MEDIA: The stories flowed like wine. Three authors — Anne Rodgers, Phoebe Fox and Sarah Bird — presided over a lively Green Shores dinner party Friday night. Fox — aka Tiffany Yates Martin — hosted alongside salt-of-the-earth hubby and techster Joel Martin, who kindly changed the tire on our old/new land yacht after the party. Kip and I shared a few stories, too, as did engineer George Jones, but the evening belonged to the women. Bird ("Above the East China Sea") is the most renowned. Austin has played a key role in some of her novels, including "Alamo House" and "How Perfect Is That." Rodgers, formerly of the American-Statesman, currently charms the country with tales of real sex in "Kiss and Tell." Fox, a top-shelf book editor and columnist, made a recent foray into fiction with "The Breakup Doctor." Together, the three could easily host a TV series on how to navigate the modern social world.

POLITICS: This happened yesterday. From Jonathan Tilove and Tony Plohetski’s story in the Statesman: "Texas Gov. Rick Perry, in the twilight of his 14th year in office and widely thought to be a 2016 presidential contender, was indicted Friday on felony charges arising from his effort to force the resignation of District Attorney Rosemary Lehmberg after she was arrested for drunken driving. In a decision that could hamper Perry’s presidential aspirations, a Travis County grand jury indicted Perry, 64, on two felonies: abuse of official capacity and coercion of a public servant. The charges came one year and two months to the day that Perry, by vetoing a $7.5 million two-year state budget appropriation to Lehmberg’s office, carried out a threat to withhold the funding unless she stepped down. Lehmberg, a Democrat, remains in office. Perry, a Republican, is the first Texas governor to be indicted in nearly a century, and he faces serious charges that carry up to 109 years in prison and $20,000 in fines. Texas Republicans decried the indictments as a partisan attack on Perry. Texas Democrats pounced on the charges as evidence that Perry cares more about politics than about middle-class Texans." http://shar.es/1nJ9W4

HISTORY: A great job looking back at past indictments of top Texas officials. From Tim Eaton’s story in the Statesman: "From statewide officials to sheriffs, Texas has seen dozens of indictments handed up to public officials. Some were acquitted. Some convicted. Some went to prison. Some became high-dollar lobbyists. Others went on to successful political careers. Some notable cases: … (Tim goes on to look at charges against officials going back to Gov. James "Pa" Furguson. Worth digging back into history.) http://shar.es/1nJ9zV