Long before Paul Qui and Tyson Cole and Bryce Gilmore, one of the best-known chefs from the Lone Star State was Dean Fearing, who earned his reputation as the "Father of Southwestern Cuisine" at the Mansion at Turtle Creek and Fearing’s at the Ritz-Carlton in Dallas.

In 1994, Fearing won Best Chef Southwest at the James Beard Awards, which will be handed out this weekend in New York. (Gilmore is among the finalists for that award this year; Qui and Cole won in 2012 and 2011, respectively.)

On Tuesday, Fearing will be in Austin for an event at 7 p.m. at BookPeople, 603 N. Lamar Blvd., for his newest cookbook, "The Texas Food Bible: From Legendary Dishes to New Classics" (Grand Central Publishing, $30).

The book, Fearing’s third, definitely feels like a restaurant cookbook, with recipes for sauces, sides, salts, rubs and marinades that build on one another to create show-stopping dishes, like Shrimp Diablo Tamales or South Texas Antelope with Cactus Pear Glaze and a Chile-Braised Rabbit Enchilada.

As Texas cuisine has evolved, so has Fearing’s style, and the fresh photographs and haute yet homey dishes reflect that the acclaimed chef is still relishing his role as a leader in the industry.