Editor’s note: This article was originally published October 11, 2013

After a second dose of Pacha Massive at the Zilker Tent — go with what you like — I wandered lonely as a cloud around the nearby Art Market. I wasn’t lonely for long. Festers flocked to the booths selling T-shirts, jewelry, hats, shoes, posters, belt buckles, mugs, coasters, belts, sunglasses, guitars, drums, dresses, beads and rather large artwork. Some served utilitarian purposes, others tempted with aesthetic otherness. The Teysha booth was mobbed. Here, Travis Breighan and Sophie Eckrich have struck on a thoroughly appealing concept: Patched of patterned fabrics woven onto boots, slippers and other apparel. "ACL is the perfect place for us," Breighan says. "People come from across the country for art and music. They are fascinated by the patterns and colors, out here to enjoy the beauty of the world." The boots, running $180-$240, are from Guatemala, the slippers, $70-$120, are from the Kuna tribe in Panama. The Austin-based company, devoted to fair trade, is worth another look. Edgar Diaz, who lives in extreme South Austin, happened on his Vintage Wear brand by accident. He collects small antiques. About three years ago, he began to mount them on thick leather cuffs. They flew off the shelves. The rock-ready cuffs run $45-$500. "It feeds my need for finding and collecting," Diaz says of business. "Then making what I find into a wearable piece of art." Again, worth a longer look in the newspaper. Tim Scarborough’s vinyl hammocks go by the name SoCo. The name is not about South Congress Avenue, but rather Social Consciousness. The lightweight, water resistant hammocks come with adjustable straps so they can be hung almost anywhere, as salesman Kain Gandy persuasively explained. They hold up to 450 pounds. (That’s good to know.) Scarborough uses a group called Texas Refugees to assemble the hammocks and 10 percent of the profits go to charity. Right now, you can only get them online if you are not at ACL. I expect to see one strung up between trees by the end of the fest.