Channel Master’s FLATenna is an example of an inexpensive antenna for picking up digital TV signals. It sells for about $10. Credit: ChannelMaster.com

A reader, Jane, writes, “When I set up my TV and did a search for available channels the TV didn’t pick up NBC or The CW. I get two Fox Channels (7.0 and 7.1), the three or four PBS channels, ABC and CBS. I have a rabbit-ear antenna. Any ideas of how I can tune those channels in? Getting cable is not an option.”

My first inclination would be to recommend a more powerful antenna; you can find one more suited to picking up digital channels for under $40, but before you do that, you might want to visit antennaweb.org and plug in your home address for advice on what kind of antenna to buy and what channels you should expect to receive.

You might want to read this thread on Reddit from Austinites having similar issues: http://www.reddit.com/r/Austin/comments/2b6rsd/anyone_in_the_austin_area_use_antenna_for_tv/

If you have broadband Internet, you might look at devices such as Roku or Apple TV that can bring you lots of additional programming without monthly fees or access to paid services such as Netflix, which costs $8.95 a month. I know that defeats the purpose of getting rid of a monthly bill, but it’s still cheaper than satellite or cable TV.

In this space every week, we’ll define a tech term, offer a timely tip or answer questions about technology from readers. Email ogallaga@statesman.com.