COOKBOOKS

Martha goes meatless for newest book

Behind the Martha Stewart empire are dozens of chefs and kitchen staff who create and test recipes for the many outlets within the Martha brand, and this month, they have released a new book, "Meatless: More than 200 of the Very Best Vegetarian Recipes" (Clarkson Potter, $25), a compilation of their favorite meat-free recipes. Stewart herself wrote the book’s introduction, which includes her own story of how she’s come to reduce the amount of meat in her diet, and as the number of people cutting out or reducing the amount of meat they eat grows, we’ll continue to see more cookbooks helping people with the transition. "Meatless" offers a nice mix of cuisines, from tacos to curries to stir-fries, and courses, including salads that can pass as dinner, nontraditional pasta and noodle dishes and single-pot suppers. It’s not vegetable-heavy, like many recipes in the book, but this herbed ricotta souffle caught my eye for its simplicity because you just don’t find many recipes like it in cookbooks these days. Pair it with a main course of your own choosing for a surprise at dinnertime.

SUPPER CLUBS

Dinner series at Franklin Barbecue blends food, rock ‘n’ roll

Austin’s supper club scene is thriving, but in February, another player will step onto the dance floor. Fiore Tedesco was a touring musician who, when his band stopped going out on the road so much, started a cooking career, which has included stints at notable New York restaurants Roberta’s and Gramercy Tavern and an underground supper club in Brooklyn. He and his family moved to Austin a few years ago, and for the past six months, he’s been working on a new supper club called L’oca D’oro ("Golden Goose" in Italian) that will launch in February at Franklin Barbecue, where he works during the day.

Tedesco says that the seed for a supper club was planted long ago when he was a kid, where every Sunday, his family would gather at his grandparents’ house for an afternoon full of home-cooked food and boisterous bantering among aunts, uncles, cousins and whoever else showed up that day. "When I was young I had assumed that was how everybody ate on Sunday," he writes on the website. "It wasn’t until those Sunday meals were long gone that I realized how special they were."

Dinner to Rock is the name of the first series, which will take place every Sunday at Franklin Barbecue, 900 W. 11th St. Each five-course dinner ($90, $125 with wine and beer pairings) will revolve around a different band, with each course tied to an album, starting with the Pixies (Feb. 3), Metallica (Feb. 10), Fleetwood Mac (Feb. 17) and The Stooges (Feb. 24). Dinner to Rock will continue after February, and Tedesco will announce a month’s worth of bands at a time. The dinners will feature wine pairings from Adam Orman, a friend of Tedesco’s who is also the general manager of the project. (On each night, there will be both a 6:30 p.m. seating and a 9 p.m. seating, and you can also order beer and wine a la carte, if you prefer.) Tickets go on sale today at locadoroaustin.com.

AWARDS

Austinites win Good Food Awards

A number of Austin food makers were among the dozens of winning artisans at the annual Good Food Awards in San Francisco last weekend. Nita Garcia, who runs Aunt Nita’s Homestyle Foods, won for her sweet jalapeño relish, and Pogue Mahone Pickles’ owner Sam Addison won for his jalapeño mint pickles. (You’ll find both of these products at the Cedar Park Farmers Market on Saturdays, and Pogue Mahone Pickles are also sold at the Saturday market at Barton Creek Square mall and the Sunday markets at Mueller and Lakeway.) Rinkon Farm, which has a booth at the Barton Creek Farmers Market on Saturdays, won for its raspberry preserves, and local breweries Independence Brewing Co. and Jester King won for their Convict Hill Stout and Boxer’s Revenge beers, respectively. Cuvee Coffee, which is based in Spicewood, was honored for its El Molino Witness Project coffee.