On Dec. 14, documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock posted a statement discussing his own history of harassment and sexual misconduct, ranging from a rape allegation to settling a harassment claim to generally being part of the problem.

Spurlock was propelled to fame via his 2004 documentary "Super Size Me," in which he ate nothing (operative word here being nothing) but McDonald’s food for a solid month.

Or did he?

In his statement, discussing the possible reasons for his behavior, Spurlock wrote: "Or is it because I’ve consistently been drinking since the age of 13? I haven’t been sober for more than a week in 30 years, something our society doesn’t shun or condemn but which only served to fill the emotional hole inside me and the daily depression I coped with." (emphasis added).

Spurlock seems to have admitted that he was drinking, possibly heavily, for much if not all of the time his groundbreaking documentary was being made.

The film, made for $65,000, grossed more than $22 million.

He recently left his production company Warrior Poet following his statement and the Sundance Film Festival announced Friday that they removed "Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!" from the Sundance slate. YouTube Red is also no longer releasing the film.

Calls and emails to Warrior Poets were not immediately returned.