Editor’s note: This article was originally published January 14, 2014

Bye, bye, Jim Cantore.

So long, Sam Champion.

Adios, Al Roker.

At 11 p.m. Monday, DirecTV and The Weather Channel parted ways, leaving about 20 million subscribers of the nation’s largest satellite service without one of TV’s go-to sources for weather information.

The dispute, reportedly, is over cash compensation. The Weather Channel allegedly wants a per-subscriber fee that’s higher than what it previously received from DirecTV.

The exact dollar amount has been closely guarded.

Whatever it was, DirecTV balked, claiming many customers were annoyed with the growing number of reality shows airing on The Weather Channel, replacing what used to be up-to-the-minute weather updates all day long.

The Weather Channel, meanwhile, says it’s providing a life-saving service — a noble argument, but one that ratings just don’t back up.

When severe storms hit Central Texas, and most other cities across the nation, viewers overwhelmingly tune to local network affiliates, not cable TV.

In place of The Weather Channel, DirecTV has added on channel 361 Denver-based WeatherNation, which it said airs "24/7 hard news weather coverage."