Though the closing of Emo's downtown had some in Austin speculating about the future of live music on Red River Street, James Taylor was not one of them.

In a month, Taylor is set to open Holy Mountain, a new bar/music venue at 617 E. Seventh St., the space formerly occupied by the Beauty Bar, which closed after South by Southwest this year.

The space will offer what co-owner, booker and manager Taylor — who previously worked at the Beauty Bar, neighboring club Red 7 and Red River dance club Plush — describes as an "American heritage" feel, with bare concrete floors and reclaimed wood décor.

The capacity will be around 300, and there will be no particular theme to the acts booked in the room.

"I want to do rock shows, dance shows, hip-hop shows, country shows, because that's what I'm into," he says. "I like Waylon Jennings and Wu-Tang Clan, and I think there's other people that like that too, and I want to do both sides of that."

As for the wave of development forecast to accompany the in-progress Waller Creek tunnel project, Taylor says he doesn't believe it's moving as fast as some think.

"I certainly am not an expert on the development plans for the block," he says. "My attitude is we're going to keep doing this until the bulldozers are coming down the street, and there is scaffolding being built around us."

Spoon lives. Spoon frontman Britt Daniel debuts his new band, Divine Fits — which also includes Dan Boeckner of Wolf Parade and Handsome Furs, and Sam Brown of New Bomb Turks — Wednesday at Beerland. From there, the group will kick off a tour in support of their new album, "A Thing Called Divine Fits."

Spoon fans wondering about the fate of Daniel's other band shouldn't fret.

In addition to a series of benefit shows for former Austin Chronicle columnist/current Houston Press editor Chris Gray and a festival appearance in Spain this year, Daniel said he's written a couple of new Spoon songs.

"Everybody wanted to go have fun and do some new things," Daniel said of the band's break. "Not that Spoon wasn't fun, but we were on this schedule where we were recording or touring for 10 years. We wanted to get off of that treadmill a little bit."

Daniel added that he enjoyed playing in Spain but lamented missing a set from fellow Austin performer Alejandro Escovedo.

"We played at the exact moment that Alejandro Escovedo played, which was such a bummer for me because he was the band I most wanted to see at the festival," he said. "It was like when we played Fun Fun Fun Fest, the band I most wanted to see was the Damned, and we played at the exact same time."

ACL Fest avoids conflict. Last week, a day after promoters announced that the fest could stretch to two weekends next year, the Austin City Limits Music Festival released the schedule for this year's fest.

Unlike previous years, there isn't too much in the way of conflicts.

On Friday, headliners the Black Keys are up against Avicii. Fans will also have to choose from among Thievery Corporation, M83, Umphrey's McGee and M. Ward.

The Afghan Whigs play part of their set at the same time as Tegan and Sara.

Weezer, the Black Lips and Florence and the Machine will also perform on competing stages.

Saturday's schedule pits Neil Young and Crazy Horse against Jack White, a conflict that will have at least some people choosing between them. Other conflicts that day include the Roots vs. the Shins and Andrew Bird vs. Metric.

On Sunday, Red Hot Chili Peppers get the final headlining slot to themselves.

The Avett Brothers go up against Iggy and the Stooges, Die Antwoord plays at the same time as the Weeknd, and Civil Wars play against Two Door Cinema Club.

ACL Fest is Oct. 12-14 at Zilker Park. It is sold out except for VIP tickets.

Contact Peter Mongillo at pmongillo@statesman.com; 445-3696