Blanton’s ‘Soundspace’ heads to 1960s New York

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Blanton’s ‘Soundspace’ heads to 1960s New York

Editor’s note: This article was originally published April 23, 2014

Editor’s note: This article was originally published April 23, 2014

The Blanton Museum of Art’s SoundSpace easily claims must-see status.

Twice a year, Austin’s new music/alt-classical community —led by Soundspace artistic director Steve Parker — fills expected and surprising space throughout the museum, performing music that dovetails with the art on display.

The series returns on April 27 at 2 p.m., this time with a lineup of once-experimental works by famed minimalist composers Steve Reich, Phillip Glass and others who based in Lower Manhattan in the 1960s.

The Soundspace program dovetails with the sublime exhibit, “Converging Lines: Eva Hesse and Sol LeWitt” that brilliantly illuminates the fascinating friendship of the two artists who became close friends in the heady creative climate of 1960s Lower Manhattan.

The Austin-based Invincible Czars will lead off the program, performing their adaptation of Terry Riley’s iconic In C.

Other highlights include…

  • Reich’s Clapping Music and Drumming performed by line upon line percussion,
  • Reich’s Different Trains by the Felix Quartet , principals of the Austin Symphony Orchestra and Austin Lyric Opera
  • Duo performances on piano harp by Outlier, comprised of New York based Max Bernstein and San Antonio-based Mark McCoin.
  • Jason Phelps of Intergalactic Nemesis will perform conceptual works from La Monte Young’s Composition 1960
  • Brent Fariss of the New Music Co-opwill showcase several new compositions.
  • One Ounce Opera will invite visitors participate in Glass’s The New Rule, a work composed for both amateur and professional singers

Also look for sound installations in unexpected locations throughout the museum, including iReich’s Pendulum Music and Solo Motion Sound and Glass’ 1+1.

Admission to “Soundspace” is free with museum admission: $9 for adults, $7 seniors, $5 students. Free for UT students, faculty and staff and children 12 and under. www.blantonmuseum.org

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